Thursday Three #44

  1. There are only about 3 weeks left until the baby is due (give or take), and we have all the “stuff” we need, but I’m not ready. Supposedly that will all change when he is born, but I’ll have to see it to believe it.
  2. For some reason, I always end up reading Stephen King during the holidays, and I just finished his story collection Four Past Midnight. It is a good representation of King’s best work, and I found “The Library Policeman” to be the scariest thing I have read in a long time. Way scarier than some of his more recent stuff.
  3. This is a pretty interesting article on the danger of the addicting video game Fortnite. I’ve never played it and have no desire to, but it sounds like the addiction is comparable to what occurred with World of Warcraft or Runescape not too long ago. I wouldn’t say that Fortnite itself is the problem. The way the games are created (to foster addiction) is the problem.

Upon Re-Reading the Harry Potter Series

Not too long ago, my husband was going through the remainder of his possessions that were left in his parents’ attic and found the entire Harry Potter series, so he brought them home and I started reading them.

I absolutely loved the series when it first came out and obsessively read the first four books over and over (I didn’t own the last three) until I practically had them memorized. But when I went to college, I was finished with the series and didn’t pay any more attention to it beyond watching the movies (and I hardly remember the movies).

So these are my main impressions after not having read the Harry Potter books for a number of years:

(1) It’s a great story. The plot is well done, and I have always liked how things that don’t seem to have much significance suddenly become significant later on. J.K. Rowling is a master at “planting” items or people in the plot.

(2) It’s still impossible to put down. Even though I knew what was going to happen, I plowed through the books as though I had never read them before. In a way, this is almost annoying because you want to keep reading so badly that it’s hard to take a step back and savor the books. I suppose that’s why they get read multiple times.

(3) I don’t know why the haters say the series is poorly written or bad. Yes, J.K. Rowling does have some annoying quirks to her writing (using em dashes and ellipses too much is one that comes to mind), but what author doesn’t? I stand by my statement of some years ago that Harry Potter is not “literature” per se, but it is a good, classic story. Just because something’s not “literature” doesn’t mean it’s trash. Everything has a purpose.

Maybe after this, I should re-read the Chronicles of Narnia series (another that I dearly loved) and see if it’s held up well over the years. I already tried getting back into the Dragonriders of Pern series a while back and found that it had no appeal to me whatsoever (and I was absolutely obsessed with those books in middle and high school).

Having a Home Library

After reading this article (https://psmag.com/education/home-libraries-confer-long-term-benefits), I now feel justified in having a ton of books around the apartment. Many of them are my husband’s because I don’t tend to accumulate books, even though after reading the article I wish I did, and I wish I had kept many of my childhood favorites.

Children who grow up in homes with many books supposedly do better in not just reading, but also science and math. I suppose that is because (obviously) the parents are more learned and value learning, and if the parents value learning, they will teach the child those same values. It’s probably not the presence of the books themselves, but who knows? Perhaps if a bookshelf full of classic children’s literature was placed into a house where the parents didn’t read much or seem to care about learning, the children would feel curious and pick up the books.

The article states, “Children emulate parents who read,” which strikes me as absolutely true. I remember idly picking up my parents’ books and flipping through them when I was a kid because they fascinated me, but I could rarely get more than a page or two into them because they were written for adults and thus over my head. But perhaps the mere action of picking up a book and wondering what’s inside it can spark imagination and encourage a child to read more books in general.

So now when I want to buy another book, I can feel good knowing that I am building up my bookshelf and thus (hopefully) my child’s intelligence and curiosity.