Blogging

Thursday Three #45

  1. If you want to read something extremely creepy, I would recommend Josh Malerman’s novel Inspection. It’s like a mix of The Giver and Never Let Me Go, but darker than both of those combined. I would go so far as to say that it reminds me of something Dean Koontz or Stephen King would write… and that’s a compliment. The premise: What happens when two crazy scientists decide to conduct an experiment to determine whether genius really is distracted by the opposite sex?
  2. Having a child has given me incentive to write, which doesn’t make sense. I thought that once I had the baby, I would be tired 24/7 and never feel like doing anything. The opposite is true. It’s almost like I finally realized my own mortality and that I had better accomplish what I want to before I’m dead. What a strange feeling.
  3. Notre Dame. It is a shame that the cathedral burned, and is probably symbolic of the decline of Western civilization, but as with most news events, there is nothing that most people, as individuals, can do about it. We can pray, and that’s basically it. Freaking out is not going to solve anything. If you want to slow the decline of Western civilization, work on your own life and your own mentality first.
Writing

Artificial Writing

Anthony Lee Collins briefly mentioned this article in one of his blog posts, and I was intrigued. Now computers can help you write your fiction using artificial intelligence. The very notion of this gets me really pissed off because I’m already annoyed by Gmail’s new feature that tries to write your emails for you.

Supposedly, the software mentioned in the article won’t write the entire story for you. You have to give it some kind of jumping-off point, and it will suggest phrases. Still… seems like cheating to me. Or a weird kind of “found poetry,” where you didn’t write the words but really just reorganized them into something that makes sense.

This was the scariest line in the article: “Megasellers like John Grisham and Stephen King could relatively easily market programs that used their many published works to assist fans in producing authorized imitations.”

I suppose “authorized” is the key word, but even so, the whole thing sounds like fanfiction at best and plagiarism at worst. If I was a well-known author, I would not allow my work to be copied like that, even though imitation is the highest form of flattery.

What do you think of AI helping with writing?

Blogging

Thursday Three #43

  1. My thought on the Kavanaugh affair (well, on sexual assault in general): I honestly feel like some women are crying wolf for various reasons. It seems like something accidental or even looking at a woman the wrong way is now considered sexual assault if it is a painted a certain way. If that is really the case, then high school was one long, drawn-out assault, and practically every high school boy is an assailant. True, drawing the line is difficult, especially when it’s one person’s word against another’s, but the definition of “sexual assault” unfortunately tends to be flexible.
  2. Parenting books. Usually, if I tell someone I’m reading a parenting book, they start laughing because there is apparently nothing about parenting that can be learned from a book. But I find them useful because they seem to give at least an idea of what to expect, even though all the ones I’ve flipped through come with the caveat that “every child is unique. Don’t freak out if he or she doesn’t meet each milestone exactly on time.” OK. Easier said than done, I guess.
  3. Everybody needs to read We Are Not Ourselves by Matthew Thomas. I’ve read a lot of “realistic fiction,” but this book is by far the most realistic of all the realistic fiction I’ve ever read and one of the better books I have read so far this year. Yes, it is incredibly sad, but it’s sad because everything in it is true. Nothing is sugar coated. The book is pretty long, but it is actually a fairly quick read.