Thursday Three #44

  1. There are only about 3 weeks left until the baby is due (give or take), and we have all the “stuff” we need, but I’m not ready. Supposedly that will all change when he is born, but I’ll have to see it to believe it.
  2. For some reason, I always end up reading Stephen King during the holidays, and I just finished his story collection Four Past Midnight. It is a good representation of King’s best work, and I found “The Library Policeman” to be the scariest thing I have read in a long time. Way scarier than some of his more recent stuff.
  3. This is a pretty interesting article on the danger of the addicting video game Fortnite. I’ve never played it and have no desire to, but it sounds like the addiction is comparable to what occurred with World of Warcraft or Runescape not too long ago. I wouldn’t say that Fortnite itself is the problem. The way the games are created (to foster addiction) is the problem.

Having a Home Library

After reading this article (https://psmag.com/education/home-libraries-confer-long-term-benefits), I now feel justified in having a ton of books around the apartment. Many of them are my husband’s because I don’t tend to accumulate books, even though after reading the article I wish I did, and I wish I had kept many of my childhood favorites.

Children who grow up in homes with many books supposedly do better in not just reading, but also science and math. I suppose that is because (obviously) the parents are more learned and value learning, and if the parents value learning, they will teach the child those same values. It’s probably not the presence of the books themselves, but who knows? Perhaps if a bookshelf full of classic children’s literature was placed into a house where the parents didn’t read much or seem to care about learning, the children would feel curious and pick up the books.

The article states, “Children emulate parents who read,” which strikes me as absolutely true. I remember idly picking up my parents’ books and flipping through them when I was a kid because they fascinated me, but I could rarely get more than a page or two into them because they were written for adults and thus over my head. But perhaps the mere action of picking up a book and wondering what’s inside it can spark imagination and encourage a child to read more books in general.

So now when I want to buy another book, I can feel good knowing that I am building up my bookshelf and thus (hopefully) my child’s intelligence and curiosity.

Library Nerdiness

When I got married, I moved to a new county, and the most exciting thing (other than getting married, of course) was joining my new county’s library system, which is much larger than the one I was used to.

However, I soon realized that a larger library system doesn’t necessarily have more books. As I perused the shelves at the new library, I saw that they contained several copies of the newest and most popular books, which is nice. In my old library, when a new book came out, I had to wait what seemed like forever to check it out because everyone would jump on it before I did.* Because there were literally ten copies of the newest Stephen King, I was able to check it out and renew it once without the system telling me I couldn’t renew it because some other patron had requested it.

Then I began to realize that the new library does not seem to keep older books on the shelves unless they are classics or extremely popular. When it comes to nonfiction, that is likely a good thing because nonfiction stuff tends to go “out of date” faster than fiction because new developments come up in the field.** Even with fiction, it’s somewhat of a good thing because to be honest, most novels don’t withstand the test of time and should be culled to make room for the newer ones.

I wondered what they did with all the older books, then remembered The Giant Book Sale that goes on every spring. The library system gathers all its unwanted/discarded/out-of-date books (and others that I assume are donated) into a huge expo center and sells them over the course of three days. If you want the best and biggest variety, it is better to go on the first day and grab as many books as you can lay your greedy hands on, but on the third day, what remains is sold at dirt-cheap prices, so you still end up with a good deal. It is like heaven for book nerds. My old county does an annual book sale, too, but theirs is much smaller and has much less variety.

The reason for that is probably because my old county keeps many of its older books on the library shelves. In terms of nonfiction, this is annoying because who the hell cares about the 1992 edition of What Color Is Your Parachute? and the 1980 edition of Writer’s Market? (I exaggerate, but still…) But it is nice that older fiction stays on the shelves longer because you have a better chance of getting to read most of an author’s backlist, and nerds like me might not discover those books otherwise. It is also nice to still see books that I read in my teens on the shelf many years later. It’s like seeing old friends, and it makes me happy because it means that some other nerdy teenager can discover the books the same way I did (assuming teenagers can rip their eyes away from their screens long enough to read a book).

All of this difference is probably because my new county is still a lot more wealthy than the old one, and they can afford to buy new books all the time. But the difference was interesting. Maybe when I retire, I can be one of those old ladies who volunteers at the library, reads to little kids, and tells everyone to shush. Perhaps I could get some say, or at least some deeper insight, into what goes into those decisions about which books to buy for the library and which to get rid of.

*It is extremely rare when I buy books brand new. I hate to say this because it doesn’t support authors, but I just can’t justify laying down $20 or more for a book that I will likely read only once.

**Even nonfiction has its classics, though.