How to Fix the Church

The Catholic Church is messed up. We are dealing with the sex abuse crisis, the financial abuse crisis, people who call themselves Catholic but don’t know or follow the Church’s teachings, all the Pachamama drama that went down during the recent Amazon synod, and a host of other issues.

Some of the “traditional” Catholics are saying that these bad fruits are growing from the seed of the Novus Ordo Mass (AKA the form of the Mass that has been done since Vatican II in the 1960s). They believe that the faith has been weakened because of the lack of reverence that has come about since Latin became abandoned. “Progressive” Catholics believe that the “old ways” represent a lack of mercy and an overabundance of judgment.

This finger pointing seems to be an excuse to justify a variety of sins. I’ve said on here before that it is easy to pick out “obvious” sins like the sexual ones. It is harder to tell when someone’s great sin is pride. Ultimately, God is the judge. Our job is to seek him in all things and to purify ourselves so we want nothing more than to be with him for all eternity. Much of what we think is helpful is actually counterproductive, like writing blog posts like this one or arguing on social media.*

What are Catholics supposed to do? At this point, it needs to be a lot less “armchair politics” and social media/blog time wasting and a lot more direct works of mercy, like volunteering, donating, praying, or sitting in front of Jesus during Adoration. The more we fill our time with productive work for God and others, the less time we have to fill our minds with judgment and news of everything that is going wrong. This approach would work regardless of whether you consider yourself a “traditional” or “progressive” Catholic.

*This might be my last blog post on this subject. The more I sit here ranting about the problem, the more I become part of the problem and the less time I have to help solve it, which brings to mind this quote:

She generally gave herself very good advice (though she very seldom followed it).

Lewis Carroll

Thoughts?

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